Hitting me that this isn’t waiting for me at home anymore. SDCC made it easier to pretend that it hadn’t happened. Sigh.

Hitting me that this isn’t waiting for me at home anymore. SDCC made it easier to pretend that it hadn’t happened. Sigh.

So that happened…

So that happened…

She’s my favorite. @sarahgeedos

She’s my favorite. @sarahgeedos

How Big of a Problem is Harassment at Comic Conventions? Very Big. | Bitch Media


bryanqmiller:

janelleasselin:

I wrote about the sexual harassment survey I conducted and what it means for comic conventions.

Witnessed an incident in-progress at a recent convention, but couldn’t find a single staff member to alert. And, by the time I did, the perpetrator was L-O-N-G gone. Maybe I should have snapped a photo to share w/ them? But, even then, the infrastructure on their side wasn’t such that anything could have been done about it.

And this is a huge part of the problem. Cons don’t publicize what people should do and so even generally well-informed and well-intentioned people don’t know how to resolve a situation. I’d say ideally, yes, a photo is helpful so that even if the person gets away through the crowd the photo can be distributed through security to get them kicked out. That is, of course, if a convention has a policy and reporting infrastructure for harassment.

How Big of a Problem is Harassment at Comic Conventions? Very Big. | Bitch Media


janelleasselin:

I wrote about the sexual harassment survey I conducted and what it means for comic conventions.

My dear, darling, sweet cat Chicken passed away last night at 10.5 years old. It was sudden and unexpected and completely awful. I’m devastated and so are Paul and Monkey, her littermate and brother who has never been apart from her for more than a few hours. I adopted her from the shelter when she was 12 weeks old and we have been together ever since. I’m a complete wreck.

All day people have asked me to tell them if they can help in some way, which is lovely and appreciated. Mostly I’m just sad and I’m trying to get as much of the sad out today as possible before I have to go to San Diego Comic-Con tomorrow.

If you would like to feel like you have done something to make me feel better or just to express your sadness at the passing of an animal, you could always donate to an animal shelter. In fact, if you want to kill two birds with one stone (a tactic Chicken would whole-heartedly endorse), take comics you hate off your pull list and give some or all of that money to help animals and/or the rest to better comics that won’t make you sad. This will do cats like Chicken a lot of good and is way better than making me weepy on a convention floor (avoiding that really is for the good of everyone). And look at that photo! Chicken loved comics too. She was also partial to Game of Thrones. A true geek lady through and through.

A suggestion for a place to start is one of my local charities:

http://www.santedor.org/donate

But of course you should donate however and wherever and any amount you like. This is just my suggestion since people have been asking. 

<3

Gender and Comics Panel


janelleasselin:

You like gender and comics? *I* like gender and comics. What is happening?!

Sorry, my inner Mabel kicked in. Anyway, I’ll be at the Gender and Comics Panel at San Diego Comic-Con this Friday at 10am in Room 4. Here are the details:


Panelists explore both the role of gender in mainstream and independent comics, as well as the impact of gender politics on the business side of the industry and in the media. Moderated by comics editor Janelle Asselin, the panel inclides ComicsAlliance.com senior editor Andy Khouri, BOOM! Studios editor Dafna Pleban, comics writer James Tynion IV (The Woods), Image comics director of trade book sales Jennifer de Guzman, and WIRED writer Laura Hudson and IDW publishing editor Sarah Gaydos.

For all the details go here



And part 2 of 2 of what I anticipate this year’s Comic-Con being like.

Part 1 of 2 of what I anticipate this year’s Comic-Con being like.

An entirely empty bed and Chicken gets in the box. And Monkey protests not being the center of attention.

An entirely empty bed and Chicken gets in the box. And Monkey protests not being the center of attention.

#76: Bram Stoker’s Dracula (Dir. Francis Ford Coppola)


mercurialblonde:

image

I was ten years old when the first trailers for Francis Ford Coppola’s Bram Stoker’s Dracula first started appearing on television. It was one of the big moments in my childhood looking back on it. And it would be a few years before I would be able to see the film and when I saw it was a…

A wonderful piece of writing about one of my favorite films.

frankenlincoln:

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?
Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.
So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”
All hands went up.
"How many of you want to make comics some day?"
Most of the hands went up.
Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”
Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”
"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.
She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”
That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.
It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.
The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

The part where the girl says she feels uncomfortable in the comic shop she goes to upsets me.

Me too, Brian. That was the kind of experience I had literally 20 years ago when I went into my first shop. I didn&#8217;t go back into a shop for 8 years and only then because I was coaxed and accompanied. I hate that it&#8217;s STILL happening. 

frankenlincoln:

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?

Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.

So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”

All hands went up.

"How many of you want to make comics some day?"

Most of the hands went up.

Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”

Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”

"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.

She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”

That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.

It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.

The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

The part where the girl says she feels uncomfortable in the comic shop she goes to upsets me.

Me too, Brian. That was the kind of experience I had literally 20 years ago when I went into my first shop. I didn’t go back into a shop for 8 years and only then because I was coaxed and accompanied. I hate that it’s STILL happening. 

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?
Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.
So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”
All hands went up.
"How many of you want to make comics some day?"
Most of the hands went up.
Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”
Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”
"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.
She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”
That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.
It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.
The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?

Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.

So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”

All hands went up.

"How many of you want to make comics some day?"

Most of the hands went up.

Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”

Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”

"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.

She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”

That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.

It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.

The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

fandomsandfeminism:

colbywrong:

FYI. There was a typo.

I had to fix it, because I’m nit picky like that.

  • 61% of rapes/sexual assaults are not reported to the police. Those rapists, of course, never serve a day in prison.
  • If the rape is reported to police, there is a 50.8% chance that an arrest will be made.
  • If an arrest is made, there is an 80% chance of prosecution. If there is a prosecution, there is a 58% chance of a felony conviction.
  • If there is a felony conviction, there is a 69% chance the convict will spend time in jail.
  • So, even in those 39% of rapes that are reported to police, there is only a 16.3% chance the rapist will end up in prison.
  • Factoring in unreported rapes, about 6% - 1 out of 16 - of rapists will ever spend a day in jail. 15 out of 16 will walk free.

[Source]

(via misandry-mermaid)

I want to watch this show forever. (Playing House)

(Source: bricesander)